SDG 11

  1. Closing the loop on waste

    EnvironmentGlobal

    Transitioning from linear to circular models of production and consumption remains a significant challenge. How can we transform deeply ingrained practices, attitudes, and incentives across both supply and demand chains to facilitate this shift?

  2. Good intentions aren’t enough: the need for effective SDGs policy implementation

    CitiesGlobal

    SDG-related initiatives are increasingly under attack from the more right-wing, populist parts of the political spectrum, who portray the Goals as misguided, wasteful, vain, and coercive. How can cities and local governments enhance their policymaking and implementation, and – crucially – secure buy-in to ensure initiatives achieve their intended outcomes?

  3. Is clean technology transfer an empty promise?

    Economic developmentGlobal

    Technology transfer is fundamental in developing countries’ aspirations to decarbonize, yet the flow of green tech from developed nations is far below what’s needed. How can we shift investment and political incentives to truly enable the proliferation of sustainable technology worldwide?

  4. Financing for development: at a crossroads

    Economic developmentGlobal

    When the SDGs were adopted in 2015, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda set out a vision for how the Goals would be financed. A decade on, the numbers remain woefully short of requirements. Next year’s follow-up conference must enable rapid acceleration of development finance if the 2030 Agenda is to retain any hope of success

  5. Time to face the facts

    ClimateGlobal

    COP28 is a pivotal moment for the Paris Agreement. The first global stocktake presents a comprehensive view of progress towards the goals of the agreement. The synthesis report released in September makes it clear we are falling well short. The science is clear and, collectively, we have the knowledge and resources to deliver. Now it is time for political leaders to unite behind a common plan to address the climate crisis

  6. Bridging the SDG funding gap in cities

    ClimateGlobal

    The global development finance system is failing cities, yet it is in urban centers where much of the work on climate action and sustainable development must happen. Bold, urgent, and practical solutions – including new, city-focused funds or institutions, MDB reform, and other global, national, and local reforms – could expand and improve urban SDG finance

  7. The role of bonds in transforming infrastructure for net-zero

    FinancingGlobal

    Massive investment is needed in infrastructure to achieve the transition to clean energy and create resilience against the impacts of global warming. The scale of investment – as much as $9 trillion per year – exceeds the capabilities of public finance and will rely on aligning private sector financing. Green or climate bonds seem an obvious instrument for the task – are they the killer solution?